About

EDUimages is a free library of photos celebrating students—and the educators who teach them—in seven schools across the United States.

American education is evolving. Our classrooms look different. Our students are more diverse. Our teachers engage students in new and creative activities that allow them to apply their learning to the world around them. But the photos we see in the media and online often don’t reflect these changes. Instead of showing the diverse faces of real students who fill the nation’s classrooms, many stock photos showcase models who are more likely to appear in a catalogue than a public school. Typical stock photos also focus on outdated classroom models where students sit passively in rows of desks listening to a lecture. They rarely show today’s innovative instructional approaches that leverage technology and encourage students to collaborate on projects with real-world applications.

Journalists, designers, nonprofits, and education advocates need access to photos of real students and educators that show how our schools and K–12 population have changed. With this in mind, All4Ed created EDUimages in partnership with the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The collection includes more than 700 original print-quality photos of real preK–12 students and educators from seven schools that serve predominantly students of color, students from low-income families, and other historically underserved groups. These royalty-free photos are available for use under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 license (CC BY-NC 4.0) to ensure they reach the widest audience possible.

All4Ed thanks the following schools for allowing their students and educators to participate in this project: Capital City Public Charter School, Washington, DC; MC2 STEM High School, Cleveland, Ohio; Middletown High School, Middletown, Connecticut; Skyline High School, Oakland, California; Sutton Middle School, Atlanta, Georgia; UCLA Community School, Los Angeles, California; and Wesley Elementary School, Middletown, Connecticut.

Questions or comments?

Contact Kristen Loschert, All4Ed’s editorial director.